DRRM stories from the region

DepEd-Benguet pushes for Landslide-Readiness Drill

The Department of Education in Benguet is pushing for the conduct of landslide-readiness drill in light of the recent landslides in the region, which claimed scores of lives. The proposed capability enhancement training drill in schools aims to prepare and teach students on what to do before and during landslide and flash floods. Nerisa Barbosa, DepEd-Benguet Division Disaster Risk Reduction Management (DRRM) officersaid, resiliency topics will be integrated into different school subjects such as MAPEH, Science, and AralingPanlipunan. Barbosa emphasized the importance of the program knowing that the Cordillera region is landslide prone and at high risk of disasters.

 

First center for climate resilience opens in Tacloban

Tacloban City, which suffered from the devastation brought by super typhoon Yolanda in 2013, has opened the country’s first peace and resilience center in Brgy. Salvacion. Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) Officer-in-Charge Eduardo Año, who led the inauguration of the facility, said the center will serve as a learning hub for coherence, collaboration, and interdependence among various stakeholders to bring about peaceful, progressive, and resilient communities in Eastern Visayas. Seeking to hone the local government’s capabilities in disaster management and response, the center shall offer various training programs and will serve as a venue for discussion of climate resilience and disaster preparedness initiatives. Año expressed his desire to build peace and resilience center across the country.

 

5 Years after Yolanda, rehabilitation still ongoing

Years after the devastating event, the rehabilitation of the Yolanda-stricken areasare still ongoing.  The govenrment continues to build housing units for Yolanda survivors, completing as of end of October 2018 only 100,709 houses out of the target 205,128 units.  The units with occupants represent only 23% or about 46,412 houses. Malacañang cited slow processing and issuance of permitsand licenses and limited availability of titled landsas among the reasons for the rehabilitation delay.  The Palace however assured that they will work harder to speed-up the recovery efforts for Yolanda survivors.

Meanwhile, the contract for the P495-million water project for post-Yolanda resettlement sites in the northern part of Tacloban is set to be awarded by the Leyte Metropolitan Water District or (LMWD) by the end of the year. The project includes two areas. The first one is the PHP404.8-million project that covers extension of water distribution pipes, development of two new water sources, setting up and repair old pumping stations and a new reservoir, and rehabilitation of the existing reservoir. The second phase involves the rehabilitation of Tacloban City’s water pipes, amounting to PHP90-million. LMWD information officer Ma. Teresa Pascua is hopeful that the project would be fast-tracked as concerned agencies help to carry out the long-term water supply project.

International Fellowship Program on Disaster Resilience ends on a high note

The first-ever international fellowship program on disaster resilience by theBrown International Advance Research Institute (BIARI) ended on a high note, through the efforts of the institute and its partners in the Philippines – the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF) and Holy Angel University.

With the theme “Community Resilience for Natural Disasters,” the week-long program brought together local and foreign practitioners of disaster risk reduction and management (DRRM) from various sectors. The program allowed participants to learn from a pool of expert lecturers on how communities can better prepare for and respond to natural disasters. It highlights the importance of grassroots perspective in bringing community participation and collaboration in disaster management.

“PDRF is proud to be part of this historic conference hosted by world-renowned educational institutions. The link between academe, local governments, international groups, and the private sector brings together the theory and practice of disaster risk reduction in exciting ways that benefit us all,” said PDRF President Rene “Butch” Meily.

Ching Pangilinan, one of the fellows, wrote about his experience in attending the program – describing it as insightful and inspiring. “The whole week was packed with enriching panels, and workshops that covered the entire gamut of disaster risk reduction management (DRRM) and resilience, from cultural contexts of disaster resilience frameworks for psychosocial interventions, from humanitarian interventions to community-based experiences in resilience.”

Pangilinan recognizes the responsibilities that goes with being a BIARI Philippines fellow. “I am both overwhelmed by the privilege of a week-long learning, brain-tickling, eye-opening experience, and the responsibilities that come with the privilege, especially beyond Biari, as an active agent of resilience in the community, whether through research or ventures and advocating a culture of resilience in our country.”

Through the program, BIARI developed a cadre of local individuals in the Philippines and other Southeast Asian nations that can carry out and implement their new learnings – leading their community towards disaster resilience.

The fellowship program was organized with the support of the Humanitarian Innovation Initiative, Ayala Corporation, Globe Telecom, British Embassy Manila, Jose Rizal University, Curiosity, University of Santo Tomas, and University of Nueva Caceres.

Cebuana continues disaster resilience campaign, designs microinsurance for MSMEs

Continuing its over 3-year long advocacy to promote disaster resilience, Cebuana Lhuillier collaborated with multiple stakeholders and designed a microinsurance product that will help MSMEs prepare for and recover from disasters.

“Micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) are some of those that experience the most adverse impact from natural or man-made disasters.  They are as exposed as a lot of other Filipinos to typhoons, landslides, and flooding, not to mention other perils and threats such as robbery and fire,” said Jonathan Batangan, Cebuana Lhuillier First Vice President and Group Head.

“We are delighted to announce that we now offer MicroBiz Protek, a microinsurance program which insures MSMEs’ property against lightning, earthquake, typhoon, flood and other perils. Through MicroBiz Protek, we hope to help smaller Filipino businessmen ensure business continuity amid the risks brought about by the country’s vulnerability to disasters and calamities,” Batangan added.

 

About MicroBiz Protek

Aside from property protection in times of disasters, MicroBiz Protek also provides MSMEs coverage against burglary and robbery, accidental death, permanent disablement, and accidental medical reimbursement, Comprehensive General Liability (CGL) and access to AXA’s Emergency Red Button.

Plan options for MicroBiz Protek vary depending on a business owner’s location.  Fees for the micro-insurance policy covering up to 12 months can go as low as PHP2,000.

“We want to ensure MSMEs recover fast from calamities. Thus, we take effort to ensure that claims under MicroBiz Protek program are processed for only 3 to 7 days,” Batangan said.

Cebuana Lhuillier has been promoting the need to strengthen disaster resilience of vulnerable communities and sectors, including MSMEs.  In one of its Disaster Resilience Fora, Cebuana Lhuillier has alloted a segment specific to discuss MSMEs’ preparedness against disasters. It has also been an active supporter of the Department of Trade and Industry’s (DTI’s) disaster resilience training for MSMEs.

November 25 declared ASEAN Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience Day

ASEAN leaders declared November 25 of every year as ASEAN Youth inClimate Action and Disaster Resilience Day at the recent ASEAN Summit in Singapore.

The Declaration was adopted and signed by the heads of the 10 ASEAN member states namely, Brunei, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand, Singapore, Viet Nam who gathered at the 33rd ASEAN Summit last 13 November 2018.

The Philippines was at the forefront in efforts leading to the adoption of the ASEAN Declaration. As early as 2015, in support of the #NowPh (Not on Our Watch) campaign – the anti-climate change advocacyof the National Youth Commission – then Philippine President Benigno Aquino issued Proclamation No. 1160 declaring November 25 as National Day for Youth in Climate Action.  In 2017, the NYC, Climate Change Commission, and YesPinoy Foundation raised the bar and called on ASEAN neighbors to declare an ASEAN Day for Youth in Climate Action and Disaster Resilience.

“The rationale behind the push for the declaration was that young people need to be involved in climate and disaster risk reduction (DRR) decision making processes, not just consulted, and that the efforts of young people must be recognized by our leaders. By having an ASEAN wide celebration, young people from Southeast Asia can share experiences and best practices,” explained Dennis V. Mendoza of the National Youth Commission.

The ASEAN Declaration affirms the region’s commitment to encourage each ASEAN country to provide a platform for collaboration among the ASEAN youth towards climate change consciousness and initiatives. It seeks to pursue education and capacity development and strengthen youth participation in climate change adaptation and mitigation, and disaster resilience.

Latest reports show there are 213 million youth (15-34 years) in ASEAN countries. By 2038, the number is expected to peak at a little over 220 million.

“Young people comprise almost a third of the Philippine population.  Our objective is to encourage the youth to adopt a climate smart and disaster resilient lifestyle,” said Mendoza.

The NYC works towards the meaningful participation of young people in climate change and disaster reislience initiatives. It calls for the conduct of youth policy dialogues in relation to the review / development of the National Climate Change Action Plan and National DRR Plan. It provides technical assistance and training to youth organizations involved in climate action and DRR, and lobbies for national government agencies and LGUs to include the youth in local DRRM Councils.

 

 

Cebuana Lhuillier participates in disaster-resilience activities

Taking off from the launch of Cebuana Rapido, an employee volunteer group for disaster resilience-related activities, Cebuana Lhuillier has participated in a number of projects and activities meant to promote disaster resilience (DR) across the Philippines.

“I’m pleased to say that Cebuana Rapido members have taken to heart the company’s disaster resilience advocacy. In the recent months, many of our employees have volunteered in various DR-initiatives,” said Jean Henri Lhuillier, President and CEO of Cebuana Lhuillier, Inc.

 

Flood safety training, relief donation, and fire response

Cebuana Rapido is comprised of 4 teams, namely: Donation, Rehabilitation, Response, and Counseling. A number of activities have kept Cebuana Rapido members busy.

Last quarter, 40 employee volunteers from Cebuana Lhuillier already attended the two-day Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) Flood Incident Response and Safety Training (FIRST) at the MMDA Training Center.   FIRST is part of MMDA’s disaster management initiatives for capacity building in life and rescue operations.

The delegation from Cebuana was trained on disaster response, water safety training, and lifeboat handling, all of which are focused on a primary mission which is to save lives during calamity or disaster such as flooding.

Another set of employees has volunteered to participate in the disaster response initiatives of GMA Kapuso Foundation. The Cebuana Rapido Donation team helped re-pack and sorted relief goods for typhoon victims. For Iren Bello, a Cebuana Lhuillier employee, the experience was very fulfilling. “In my own little way, I want to help those who are in need especially victims of calamities” she said.

Carlo Y. Santana, CLIS Claims Lead, sees his participation in Cebuana Rapido as his contribution to educating Filipinos about the importance of preparing for unexpected catastrophes in life. Carlo joined Cebuana Rapido’s onsite response to a massive fire incident in Quezon City which has affected hundreds of families.

 

“Being part of the Rapido team is a selfless advocacy. You have to risk your life to reach out and help people in times of disasters. As a volunteer, you also need to help the victims be physically, mentally, and emotionally strong,” said Carlo. “Being prepared and resilient to any disaster is important. That it is the only way we can survive and save families and friends,” he added.

The Cebuana Rapido team’s most recent activity was the activation of its Donation team which quickly responded to the havoc caused by typhoon Ompong in North Luzon. Employee-volunteers went to Brgy. Lecaros Extension, Ugac Sur, Tuguegarao City, Cagayan and distributed relief goods. Led by Jonathan D. Batangan, First Vice President and Group Head of Cebuana Lhuillier Insurance Solutions Inc., the team also handed over their donation to representatives of Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF).

Art Relief Mobile Kitchen: Feeding the hungry in times of disasters

Food is one of human’s most basic needs. In times of disasters however, many families – traumatized, worried, and confused – find themselves with nothing, not even a simple meal. Art Relief Mobile Kitchen knew this too well and thought of a solution.

Since 2012, the non-profit group has been setting up community kitchens across the country to cook for people affected by disasters. Through the help of volunteers, Art Relief prepares warm meals at disaster sites and/or evacuation centers instead of just distributing relief goods typically comprised of dried and packed meals.

“Sometimes, all that people need to start bouncing back is a decent meal,” said Alex Baluyut, Art Relief Mobile Kitchen co-founder and president. People need something to warm their stomachs and energize their tired bodies,” Alex added.

 

The start of a mission

In November 2013, at the height of post-typhoon Yolanda operations, journalists and artists pulled their resources together to help feed families who were evacuated from Leyte to Villamor Airbase. Led by the couple Alex Baluyut and Precious Leano – who transported their entire kitchen to Villamor Airbase – the volunteers cooked warm meals for disaster victims.

“People were willing to help. Within 30 minutes upon reading my Facebook post about cooking for the evacuees, I received calls from friends offering money, food, kitchen stuff, and their own time to help us feed the hungry at Villamor,” said Alex.

Art Relief Mobile Kitchen was born. The group camped at Villamor for 22 days, and cooked non-stop for typhoon Yolanda victims.

 

Challenges and difficulties

Art Relief has fed the hungry during most of the worst disasters that hit the Philippines. Recently it has mobilized teams to cook for families and individuals affected by typhoon Ompong in Itogon, Benguet and the tragic landslide that took many lives in Naga, Cebu.

Finding the people who will cook is not a concern. While Art Relief only has 15 volunteers as part of its core, the organization is able to immediately set up mobile kitchens and cook for disaster victims because community members and even the evacuees themselves volunteer to take part in cooking and meal distribution. It has also been easy to call for help. Thanks to social media, Alex said he is able to cascade information and ask for assistance in just a few click.

The major challenge is logistics. Alex explained the difficulty in transporting kitchen equipment to disaster sites and how gathering donated food ingredients from supporters could cause logistics concerns as well.

The mission in Marawi has been the most difficult to date because of logistics and security concerns. “We were in Marawi at the height of efforts to free the city, just a few days before Philippine Independence Day. It was hard to move stuff from point A to point B. The chances of us getting caught in the cross fire was high,” Alex explained.

Despite these challenges, Art Relief vows to continue feeding the hungry in times of disasters. It has survived 6 years and is going strong.

 

Photo Credit: Art Relief Mobile Kitchen

DRRM stories from the regions

Post ‘Ompong’ rehab plan pushed for CAR

Office of Civil Defense Administrator Ricardo Jalad recommended the conduct of a comprehensive post typhoon Ompong recovery and rehabilitation plan for the Cordillera Region. The plan, he said, will play an important role in securing government funding support for the region’s rehabilitation efforts. Typhoon Ompong in CAR caused billions worth of damages in infrastructure and agriculture, affected the lives of 102,371 families, and claimed the lives of 114 people.

Source: PIA story, October 22

 

Disaster preparedness platform launched

In Cebu, more than 20 representatives from the public, private, and civil society sectors gathered to sign a memorandum of agreement for regional collaboration on disaster risk reduction and management. The event saw the launch of the Asia Pacific Alliance for Disaster Management (A-PAD) Central Visayas Regional Platform on disaster preparedness and response. A-PAD Philippines is jointly convened by the Citizen’s Disaster Response Center (CDRC) and the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF). The former is an NGO that promotes community-based disaster management through its 16 regional centers in the Philippines, while PDRF is the country’s major private sector vehicle and coordinator for disaster risk reduction and management.

Source: Manila Bulletin, October 15

 

Disaster-related projects in Negros OKd

The Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (PDRRMC) in Negros Occidental approved the funds for disaster-related projects in the province. These projects include the establishment of a two-hectareresettlement site in Hinobaan town, establishment and operations of Task Force Buglas Humanitarian and Disaster Response and Coordination Center, climate resilience in fisheries through access to insurance, and training of the Negros Occidental Special Rescue Unit as well as city and municipal fire marshals.

Source: PIA story, September 27

 

Photo credit: Philippine Information Agency Cebu

House approves disaster insurance for vulnerable and marginalized groups

Legislators hope vulnerable and marginalized groups can better prepare for disasters through insurance coverage.

The House of Representatives approved on third and final reading House Bill No. 8165, also known as the Department of Disaster Resilience Act on 1 October 2018. Chapter 10, Section 32c of the said bill provides that the “Department shall oblige the local government units the mandatory insurance coverage of assets, properties, and livelihood of vulnerable and marginalized groups for unforeseen or contingent potential losses, damages, and disruption from natural hazards and human-induced disasters.”

Funds for the mandatory insurance shall be charged against the Local Disaster Risk Funds (LDRF). HB No. 8165 provides that no less than 7% of the local revenues must be allocated to the LDRF.

The Department of Disaster Resilience shall oversee local government units’ compliance to this provision, including all climate and disaster risk-transfer and risk–sharing instruments and initiatives to ensure the protection of both public and private institutions. The Department is also mandated to ensure that all assets and properties of government agencies including government owned and controlled corporations are insured.

“Despite the Philippines’ vulnerability to extreme weather and natural disturbances, Filipinos still have a long way to go in terms of appreciating the value of insurance. Mandatory insurance for vulnerable and marginalized groups is a major step towards educating Filipino communities on how insurance can help them prepare for natural or human-induced calamities,” said Jonathan D. Batangan, First Vice President and Group Head of Cebuana Lhuillier Insurance Solutions.

Cebuana Lhuillier annually convenes the Cebuana Lhuillier Disaster Resilience Forum as part of its advocacy to empower, capacitate, and educate Filipinos to be disaster-ready and resilient. The third Disaster Resilience Forum was held in July 2018 at the Shangri-la at The Fort, Taguig City.

 

Department of Disaster Resilience

The Department of Disaster Resilience is mandated to “oversee and coordinate the preparation, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of disaster and climate resilience plans, programs, projects, and activities.” To be led by a Cabinet Secretary, the Department shall lead the continuous development of strategic and systematic approaches to make the country disaster resilient.

The Department however will only be created once the bill proposing it is signed by President Rodrigo R. Duterte. Under Philippine laws, both the House of Representatives and the Senate must approve their respective version of the bill, deliberate and draft a joint version, and submit it to the Office of the President for signature. To date, the Senate still has to approve its own version of the Department of Disaster Resilience bill.

 

Source: HB 8165

Photo Credit: Art Relief Mobile Kitchen

House approves creation of Department of Disaster Resilience

Voting 181-5-2, the House of Representatives approved on 01 October 2018 House Bill No. 8165 which provides for the creation of the Department of Disaster Resilience (DDR).

Known as the Department of Disaster Resilience Act, HB 8165 grants the DRR the power to “oversee and coordinate the preparation, implementation, monitoring, and evaluation of disaster and climate resilience plans, programs, projects, and activities.” It mandates the DRR to provide leadership in the continuous development of strategic and systematic approaches to make the country disaster resilient.

The Department shall be led by a Secretary who shall concurrently serve as Chair of the National Disaster Resilience Council, also created under HB 8165, and as Vice-Chair of the Climate Change Commission.

Agencies to Transfer to DRR

Once the DRR is created, it shall have the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) and the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) as attached agencies. The Climate Change Commission shall continue its functions but it shall be under the Department.

Likewise, the applicable powers, functions, and funds of the following offices shall be transferred to the DRR:

  • Office of Civil Defense
  • Climate Change Office
  • Geo-Hazard Assessment and Engineering Geology Section of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB)
  • Health and Emergency Management Bureau of the Department of Health (DOH)
  • Disaster Response Assistance and Management Bureau of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), and
  • Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP)

Next Step: Senate Approval

In a statement quoted by the Business Mirror, Leyte Representative Yedda Marie Romuladez asked the Senate to also fast track the approval of the pending DRR bills from their end. “This would help drastically reduce, if not totally eliminate the bureaucratic red tape that has caused many delays in the delivery of immediate assistance needed by disaster and calamity victims,” she said.

Prior to the Congress’ passage of the DRR Act, disaster management advocates weighed in on the proposed department.

Mr. Rene Meily, Executive Director of the Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF)underscores the need to provide the DRR the needed authority and clear mandate. “It needs to have the authority to call on all the resources of the government during a crisis so it’s clear they are the lead agency.  Beyond that, it might make sense for the new department to be able to engage in mitigation and preparedness activities to prevent future calamities. Resilience is a broad term so the department’s mandate must be clearly defined,”Meily said.

Mr. Jonathan D. Batangan, First Vice President and Group Head, PJ Lhuillier, Inc., hopes the creation of the proposed department will pave the way for improved community resilience against disasters. “We need to have more strategic and inclusive policies on climate change adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and disaster preparedness. Plans and initiatives should be crafted and executed with the needs of Filipino communities in mind, especially those most at-risk such as the poor, women, elderly, children, and the marginalized,” Batangan said.

Cebuana Lhuillier annually convenes the Cebuana Lhuillier Disaster Resilience Forum as it advocates the need to empower, capacitate, and educate every Filipino to be disaster-ready and resilient.

Presidential Endorsement

During his 3rd State of the Nation Address, President Rodrigo R. Duterteurged the Congress to expedite the passage of the DRR bill, saying that the Philippines needs a ‘truly empowered department characterized by a unity of command, science-based approach and full-time focus on natural hazards and disasters.”

 

sources: CNN Philippines, GMA News, ABS CBN News, Senate of the Philippines Legislative Documents, Cebuana Lhuillier’s interview with Philippine Disaster Resilience Foundation (PDRF), Rappler, Business Mirror Philippines

 

Cebuana Lhuillier starts identifying partners, beneficiaries for microinsurance donation

Families who live near esteros, low-lying coastal areas, in neighborhood most-prone to fires, and other places vulnerable to catastrophic events, Filipinos who are barely able to pay for their daily meals, individuals who can’t afford to pay for their bills when hospitalized – these are some of the people who Cebuana Lhuillier believes most deserve to benefit from its microinsurance donation project called OurHelp.

Cebuana Lhuillier announced that it has started working with partners in identifying beneficiaries for the OurHelp program. “Since the launch of OurHelp in July this year, we have already partnered with 3 organizations, and continue to partner with more – so we can cover as many beneficiaries as possible,” said Jonathan D. Batangan, PJ Lhuillier Group of Companies First Vice President and Group Head.

OurHelp is the first and pioneering donation platform that intends to help communities through insurance coverage. It features an online donation platform where donors can ensure an individual or communities who would not have access to or means of getting insurance coverage. For as low as one dollar (US$1) or fifty-three pesos (PhP53), donors can help underprivileged individuals be protected from financial challenges when unexpected and/or difficult incidents happen, such as disasters.

Initial set of beneficiaries

One of Cebuana Lhuillier’s partners, Caritas Manila, has helped them zoom in their search.

“We are targeting church volunteers who are poor and reside in areas that are high-risk to disasters such as the Sto. Niño de Baseco Parish in Tondo, Manila. The church volunteers spend and offer their 3Ts – time, talent and treasure – to Caritas without asking or expecting anything in return,” said Gilda Avedillo, Preventive Health and Disaster Management Program Manager at Caritas Manila Inc. – Damayan Program.

Batangan is optimistic that the program can help those who need insurance protection the most. “We are happy to be able to come up with an effective means to help marginalized communities in times of disasters. OurHelp is a platform that could help individuals rise up after a calamity. Through this program, more and more communities will be protected with the help of kind-hearted donors all over the world,” he said.

Beneficiaries of “OurHelp” gets microinsurance that covers death due to illness, accidental death, dismemberment and disability unprovoked murder and assault, and fire cash assistance.

The program also aims to create an impact to the community by giving a portion of every 1-dollar donation to the community basket and allocating it to scholarship programs implemented by the Cebuana Lhuillier Foundation.

Role of Microinsurance

Recognizing the role of the microinsurance industry in building disaster resilient communities, Cebuana Lhuillier has been actively engaging in efforts that will help Filipino families better prepare for, respond to, and recover from calamities. OurHelp was launched at the 2018 READY: Cebuana Lhuillier Disaster Resilience Forum held at Shangri-La at the Fort in July this year.   It is an offshoot of the company’s National Protektado Day, a campaign that highlighted the importance of microinsurance and helped insure one million Filipinos in 2016.

In a speech given by the Deputy Insurance Commissioner Dorothy Calimag in the Cebuana Lhuillier’s disaster resilience forum, she expressed that microinsurance can contribute to the Philippine economy and will help secure lives and properties among high-risk sectors. She also cited the significance of developing microinsurance suitable for the marginalized communities.

CORPORATE AGENT PARTNERS

  • ACTION.ABLE, INC.
  • ALL ACCESS GATEWAY INC.
  • ANTRECCO (AGUSAN DEL NORTE TEACHERS, RETIREES, EMPLOYEES & COMMUNITY COOPERATIVE)
  • ACM VIP
  • ALL CASH
  • AGRILIFE/ AGRIVET
  • ASENSO PINOY STORE, INC. (EASY DAY SHOP)
  • AVICOM ENTERPRISES
  • AYALA ALABANG VILLAGE ASSOCIATION
  • BAUG CARP MULTI PURPOSE COOPERATIVE
  • BAGUIO BENGUET COOP
  • CARD BANK INC
  • CARD MRI RIZAL BANK INC
  • CARD SME BANK
  • CARITAS BANCO NG MASA, INC.
  • CEBU PEOPLE’S MULTIPURPOSE COOPERATIVE
  • CIS BAYAD CENTER, INC
  • COOPERATIVE BANK OF BOHOL, INC
  • COUNTRY BUILDERS BANK
  • CREDENCE FINANCING, INC.
  • CURAMED PHARMACY
  • DALTON PAWNSHOP AND JEWELRY INC.
  • DANIELA PAWNSHOP
  • DIRECT AGENT 5 (DA 5)
  • DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILS.
  • EXPRESSPAY INC.
  • EVRIJEM FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND MONEY REMITTANCE
  • FILHAI MULTI PURPOSE COOPERATIVE
  • GLOBAL PINOY REMITTANCE AND SERVICES (GPRS)
  • GEMARY PAWNSHOP AND JEWELRY (CORP.)

OVER 600 BILLER PARTNERS NATIONWIDE

  • 123 FINANCE CORPORATION
  • 123 LENDING CORPORATION
  • 2C2P
  • 8AMC (VIA ECPAY)
  • ABEJO WATERS CORP.
  • ABRA
  • ACOM CONSUMER FINANCE CORPORATION
  • ACTIVE REALTY & DEVELOPMENT CORP.
  • ADA MANUFACTURING CORPORATION (VIA ECPAY)
  • AEON CREDIT SERVICE
  • AETERNITAS CHAPELS AND COLUMBARIUM (VIA ECPAY)
  • AFC SME FINANCE INC
  • AFTERWEST MICROLOANS INC
  • AGODA – DRAGONPAY
  • AGRIBANK
  • AGRO-INDUSTRIAL FOUNDATION COLLEGE OF THE PHILS.
  • AGUSAN DEL NORTE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.
  • AIR YOU GO TRAVELS PHILIPPINES CO.
  • AKLAN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.
  • ALAMINOS CITY WATER DISTRICT (VIA ECPAY)
  • ALLIANZ PNB LIFE INSURANCE INC.
  • ALPHA FUND SAVINGS & CREDIT COOPERATIVE (VIA ECPAY)
  • AMADEO WATER DISTRICT (VIA ECPAY)
  • AMYA POLYTECHNIC COLLEGE, INC. AND FINANCING CORPORATION (LENDPINOY)
  • ANGAT WATER DISTRICT (VIA ECPAY)
  • ANGELES ELECTRIC COMPANY ANGELICUM SCHOOL , INC. ILOILO CITY (VIA ECPAY)
  • ANJELMAN REAL ESTATE LEASING
  • ANTIQUE ELECTRIC COOP, INC ANTRECCO (BILLS PAYMENT)

OVER 600 BILLER PARTNERS NATIONWIDE

  • 123 FINANCE CORPORATION
  • 123 LENDING CORPORATION
  • 2C2P
  • 8AMC (VIA ECPAY)
  • ABEJO WATERS CORP.
  • ABRA
  • ACOM CONSUMER FINANCE CORPORATION
  • ACTIVE REALTY & DEVELOPMENT CORP.
  • ADA MANUFACTURING CORPORATION (VIA ECPAY)
  • CREDIT SERVICE
  • AETERNITAS CHAPELS AND COLUMBARIUM (via ECPAY)
  • AFC SME FINANCE INC
  • AFTERWEST MICROLOANS INC
  • AGODA – DRAGONPAY
  • AGRIBANK
  • AGRO-INDUSTRIAL FOUNDATION COLLEGE OF THE PHILS.
  • AGUSAN DEL NORTE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.
  • AIR YOU GO TRAVELS PHILIPPINES CO.
  • AKLAN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC.
  • ALAMINOS CITY WATER DISTRICT (via ECPAY)
  • CREDENCE FINANCING, INC.
  • CURAMED PHARMACY
  • DALTON PAWNSHOP AND JEWELRY INC.
  • DANIELA PAWNSHOP
  • DIRECT AGENT 5 (DA 5)
  • DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILS.
  • EXPRESSPAY INC.
  • EVRIJEM FOREIGN EXCHANGE AND MONEY REMITTANCE
  • FILHAI MULTI PURPOSE COOPERATIVE
  • GLOBAL PINOY REMITTANCE AND SERVICES (GPRS)
  • GEMARY PAWNSHOP AND JEWELRY (CORP.)

List of Accepted Government/ Valid IDs

  • Passport
  • Driver’s License
  • Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) ID
  • National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Clearance
  • Police Clearance
  • Postal ID
  • Voter’s ID
  • Philippine Identification (PhilID) card
  • Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) e-Card
  • Social Security System (SSS) ID
  • Senior Citizen’s ID
  • Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) ID
  • OFW ID
  • Seaman’s Book
  • Alien Certification of Registration (ACR)
  • Barangay Certificate or ID (with picture and signature)
  • Birth Certificate (applicable to minors only)
  • Firearm License
  • Immigrant Certificate of Registration
  • Marriage License
  • National Council for the Welfare of Disabled Persons
  • New TIN ID
  • OWWA ID
  • Student ID
  • Alien Certification of Registration (ACR) / Immigrant Certificate of Registration
  • Government Office or Government Owned and Controlled Corporations (GOCC) ID (e.g. AFP ID, HDMF (Pag-ibig Fund) ID, etc.
  • Certification from the National Council for the Welfare of Disabled Persons (NCWDP)
  • Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Certification
  • Integrated Bar of the Philippines ID (IBP)
  • Company IDs issued by private entities or institutions registered with or supervised or regulated either by the BSP (Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas), SEC (Securities and Exchange Commission) or IC (Insurance Commission)

IDs Accepted

As required by Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP), clients who engage in a financial transaction with covered institutions for the first time shall be required to present the original and submit a clear copy of at least ONE (1) valid photo-bearing identification document issued by an official authority. For our clients’ convenience, Cebuana no longer requires submission of the photocopied ID. IDs are captured using a webcam in all branches. Clients are also required to submit an updated photo and other relevant information whenever the need for it arises.

Forms of identification accepted are the following;

Pawn Accepted IDs
1. Passport
2. Driver’s License
3. Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) ID
4. National Bureau of Investigation (NBI) Clearance
5. Police Clearance
6. Postal ID
7. Voter’s ID
8. Philippine Identification (PhilID) card
9. Social Security System (SSS) Card / Unified Multi-Purpose ID (UMID)
10. Barangay Certification
11. Government Service Insurance System (GSIS) e-Card
12. Senior Citizen Card
13. Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) ID
14. OFW ID
15. Seaman’s Book
16. Alien Certification of Registration/Immigrant Certificate of Registration (for foreigners)
17. Government Office and GOCC ID, e.g., Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP ID)
18. Home Development Mutual Fund (HDMF ID)
19. Certification from the National Council for the Welfare of Disabled Persons (NCWDP)
20. Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Certification
21. Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) ID
22. Company IDs issued by private entities or institutions registered with or supervised or regulated either by the Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas, Securities and Exchange Commission or Insurance Commission
23. ID issued by the National Council on Disability Affairs (NCDA)